Red Book

Jung’s Inner Universe, Writ Large

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From “The Red Book” by C. G. Jung (W. W. Norton & Company), via Rubin Museum of Art

From “The Red Book” by C. G. Jung (W. W. Norton & Company), via Rubin Museum of Art

“We know the archetype; we cherish the myth. The hero, like the world around him, is in a state of crisis. And in seeking to restore himself and the shattered cosmos, he valiantly passes through a vale of despair, descending into darkness. He risks his life and psyche in perilous encounters with dreams or dragons and finally emerges into the light, spiritually transformed, ushering in a new age.”  Full article here.

The Making of The Red Book

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VIDEO: Red Book Dialogue with Billy Corgan

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“Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan recently visited the Rubin Museum to participate in the ongoing Carl Jung exhibit, and thanks to the videos below from Conor McMahon (and a hearty HT to SP.com), you can now see fan video from this fascinating event!”

Find more videos here, and an audio podcast here.

Red Book Dialogues: Charlie Kaufman

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“Last Saturday night’s entry in the Rubin Museum’s “Red Book Dialogues” series featured award-winning screenwriter, director and producer Charlie Kaufman (Being John MalkovichAdaptation,Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless ) and San Francisco-based Jungian analyst John Beebe.”  Listen here.

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Michael J. Palma for the Rubin Museum of Art

See more photos of the event.

Eternal sunshine of the unconscious mind

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“On Saturday, at New York City’s Rubin Museum, Academy Award-winning screenwriter Charlie Kaufman (who wrote Being John Malkovich, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Adaptation) and Jungian psychoanalyst John Beebe took the stage and were handed an image that neither had seen before. It depicted a figure of a man with a ray of light flowing into (or out of) his chest, and a snake, its head reared, coiled around his feet.”  Full article here

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Michael J. Palma for the Rubin Museum of Art

Michael J. Palma for the Rubin Museum of Art

Psychoanalyzing Twitter

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“Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey spills his inner thoughts with a psychoanalyst as part of a Carl Jung exhibit at the Rubin Museum of Art.” [Wall Street Journal]

Red Book Dialogues: Jack Dorsey, co-founder of Twitter

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On Novemeber 2, The Red Book Dialogues brought together Twitter creator Jack Dorsey and Jungian Analyst Douglas G. Tompkins to discuss an image from Jung’s book.

Photo by @Caitlinroper

Photo by @Caitlinroper

Both of them were supposed to be posting tweets live as part of the dialog, but apparently Jack Dorsey lost his network connection early in the evening.  The event did include live tweets from Tompkins, audience members, and other Twitter users projected onto a screen for the audience to read.  This result was best summed up by a tweet from audience member @trudatnyc:

this feels more like a dodecahedra-logue. listening to @jack,@douglastompkins, typing,reading the #rmat feed on projection-overload overfed!

Twitter users joined in by using the #rmat hashtag.  A favorite question of the evening was  ”what it is the shadow of twitter?”

Dream On | Sarah Silverman Meets Carl Jung

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Sarah Silverman and Jungian Analyst Michael Vannoy Adams discuss an image at the Red Book Dialogues.

Michael J. Palma for the Rubin Museum of Art

Michael J. Palma for the Rubin Museum of Art

See more photos from the event.

Jung’s Red Book: The art of psychology

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0031391daf7“Just before the first world war, the 38-year-old Swiss psychologist Carl Gustav Jung was troubled by awful dreams and visions. Analytical to the core, he embarked on what he later described as his “confrontation with the unconscious”, and documented the lot.”

The Red Book of C. G. Jung Creation of a New Cosmology

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The Red Book of C. G. Jungdescription-red_book

Creation of a New Cosmology

Exhibition at the Rubin Museum of Art

October 7, 2009 – January 25, 2010

“This unprecedented exhibition marks the first public presentation of the preeminent psychologist C. G. Jung’s (1875-1961) famous Red Book. During the period in which he worked on this book Jung developed his principal theories of archetypes, collective unconscious, and the process of individuation. It is possibly the most influential unpublished work in the history of psychology. More than two-thirds of the large, red, leather-bound manuscript’s pages are filled with Jung’s brightly hued and striking graphic forms paired with his thoughts written in a beautiful, illuminated style.”

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